Ruswai: An attempt to trample down commonplace

Ruswai revolves around a gang-rape survivor and her battle not just against the society but with a status quo that demands a woman to give in for the sake of her virtue and honor.

Recently Pakistani dramas have started to break the streak of trite and repetitive stories; dramas like cheekh, Khaas and Ruswai have been restoring our faith in the television industry. Cheekh and Khaas are now the relics of past so let’s focus our recent love – I mean Ruswai. Sometimes while emphasizing negativity undue, we completely forget positivity around us. Unfortunately, Ruswai was the casualty of our that attitude. When Ruswai was to claim its space, we were introduced with another poppycock story downplaying domestic violence. Instantly everyone took to media to denounce its vile and irresponsible attitude towards domestic violence brushing Ruswai totally aside.

Sometimes while emphasizing negativity undue, we completely forget positivity around us. Unfortunately, Ruswai was the casualty of our that attitude. When Ruswai was to claim its space, we were introduced with another poppycock story

Yesterday, Ruswai aired its last episode, and it was unbelievably phenomenal that I actually felt tears in my eyes. Every character played its role very competently. Sameera, a survivor of gang-rape, her father, her brother Hamza, Dr Feroz a companion, and Salman her husband, not for a split of the second made us lament watching it. It took a passive start and morphed into a powerful story. Sameera’s courage to fight on her own, her father’s compunction for not protecting his daughter in the first place and her abusive, typical husband who didn’t want to stain his reputation with a gang-rape survivor gave a decisive fillip to its narrative.

If Ruswai revealed an abusive husband it also did shed light on a protective, caring brother- a brother that every woman desires to have, Hamza was an important character that made Sameera’s exhausting journey tolerable, in the whole drama we just couldn’t stop admiring him being his sister’s strength; while simultaneously propelling the victim to fight her war. It didn’t shy away from showing the ugly face of our society. A poor law and justice system who instead of fighting for you, literally fight against you. A law that becomes a prostitute of the rich and influential. It’s the weak and ineptitude system that compels people to settle their issues themselves stead involving Police. Dialogues and its delivery in the last episode between both parties- Police and victim- were beyond belief.

It didn’t shy away from showing the ugly face of our society. A poor law and justice system who instead of fighting for you, literally fight against you. A law that becomes a prostitute of the rich and influential.

However, our dramas just don’t want to improve their typical vein. Good woman, bad woman stories like for ad nauseam. Sameera’s in-law was depicted as a monster woman. It was boring, to be honest, we are tired of seeing this Good woman, bad woman vapid over and over. Another paki-trope that Ruswai followed like Cheekh, was evoking sympathy for an abusive person. Salman in the end while saving Sameera got killed, getting a tender spot in our hearts. Another thing that I felt really creepy about Salman was his constant blaming behaviour toward his wife and mother. He was a grown man yet held his mother and wife responsible for his nasty behaviour, (you were not a kid who needed to be wrapped around a finger), in the entire story, his this awful attitude really riled me up.

Our dramas just don’t want to improve their typical vein. Good woman, bad woman stories like for ad nauseam. Another trope that Ruswai followed Cheekh in, was evoking sympathy for an abusive person.

Rest of the story was mind-blowing. We need more and more such stories. The stigma that a survivor is a blemish on one’s family needs to be eradicated. Silence of the victim empowers a criminal and we can’t afford to empower criminals anymore. One of the dialogues that Sameera well conveyed was

“When a victim stands for oneself, one doesn’t remain a victim but becomes a survivor”

(P.S: Entry of the Mukhtara Mai was incredibly sentimental, this drama depicted her struggle too but unfortunately, she didn’t have privileged life like a Sameera. She deserved to have this appearance, she really did)

Leave your vote

You might also like

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

  1. Muzammil Mahaar says

    After reading this blog, I felt that my own self was the narrator of it , because I ,too, had very perception for this play. It’s quite new and different from the vernacular styles of dramas. It’s story was replete of present social issue, which is need of hour to be raised by us, people.
    Usually, we find a traditional approach in every screenplay, the story revolves around two or three main characters, but it was entirely different in its technique; and also the depth of the message too much commendable. Keep writing such blogs to provide us advance level of thinking and assuming things.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.