A change for which Mashal had to extinguish

After the death of Mashal Khan we were compelled to observe an extreme response that was going to change in the years to come reminding us the saying of Medgar Evers “You can kill a man, but you can’t kill an idea”.

Three years ago in these days, Mashal Khan who asserted to be a Humanist was dragged off his room, beaten with sticks, mortified, shot to death and even after his death his body was mutilated and desecrated. A fanatic mob claiming to be educated was cherishing his vile murder, astoundingly that mob involved people from his own university. This savagery would have gone unreported but thanks to the digital camera capturing it and disclosing it to social media. People in the video could be heard reciting Allah-u-Akbar just like the day of Sacrifice while sacrificing they utter Allah-u-Akbar aloud. Probably Mashal was a sacrifice that was being offered to God.

People in the video could be heard reciting Allah-u-Akbar just like the day of Sacrifice while sacrificing they utter Allah-u-Akbar aloud. Probably Mashal was a sacrifice that was being offered to God.

Right away from Mashal’s death, we witnessed an atrocious backlash of drumbeaters on people who were decrying his death. Mashal had left the physical world but his death divided the nation into liberals, religious and neutrals, once again bringing the remnant of Salman Taseer’s death; If neutral were insisting on the judgment of God, Liberals rightfully announced him a “sacrificial victim”, while religious fanatics declared him a Murdar who needed to be uprooted from the world. However, majority triumphed. People with extreme mindset successfully persuaded their fear in common people- especially in people with liberal mindset-. In the subsequent days, we saw Humanist title turning into an affront; many people began to disown it. Seculars were intimidated with dire consequences on every front. Scores of people had to hide their identities that were at stake given affiliation with Mashal. When a condign punishment to culprits should have been a focal point our nation got tangled in the dispute of whether to call Mashal “a martyr or a culprit”.


On his first death anniversary, people were still looking for ways to appease fanatics and protect themselves from becoming a prey to the sword of blasphemy. Mashal had gone but the air of eerie continued to sting.

Majority triumphed. When a condign punishment to culprits should have been a focal point our nation got tangled in the dispute of whether to call Mashal “a martyr or a culprit”.


Nonetheless, hopes spring eternal; with the elapse of time we saw a decline in that atmosphere of creeps. After three years of dread and trepidation, I see an utterly different and pleasant state of affairs. More and more people have started to come out of that fear of zealots and talk on blasphemy law and its misuse. When three years ago even mentioning the name of Mashal was a crime today he is being owned eloquently. Thousands of people are sharing his thoughts and the tragedy of his death but I see a little counterattack from antagonists or maybe I am excessively sanguine. Mashal had left three year-ago but his ideas continue to prevail; his death offered a voice to so many tongue-tied. Today, we are fearless to call out culprits, to offer our moral support to people who are battering behinds bars for false blasphemy charges.

Mashal had left three year-ago but his ideas continue to prevail; his death offered a voice to so many tongue-tied.


I am not here to vindicate or reprimand his stance all I want to say that Mashal was young, he had dreams to support his family to make his future but on 13 April he was viciously robbed of his every dream. He should not have been killed but he was killed and we couldn’t protect him. Now it’s high time to protect others from becoming Mashal. Reforms need to be introduced. Fanatics will have to be prevented from taking law in their hands. Let’s make the pledge that we will not allow these zealots to kill our young minds any more.


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